Dirty v. Clean Produce

I’m not sure if you all share my confusion on which fruits and vegetables we should be buying organic, and which are okay to pass on the organic versions. While I would LOVE to purchase all my produce in the organic section of my grocery store, my wallet just isn’t havin’ it at this point in my life. However, I recently stumbled upon an article in Health magazine that helped me decide which fruits and vegetables are worth splurging on for the organic version. Health compiled a list of the top 10 dirtiest produce items, and the top 5 cleanest (as researched by the Environmental Working Group). Cleanliness was determined based upon the number of pesticides found on the foods, with the dirtiest totaling SIXTY-SEVEN pesticides! SICK! Here is the list, perhaps you can bring it with you next time you find yourself wondering which fruits and vegetables you should drop a paycheck on:

Veggies

Dirtiest

1. Celery – 67 pesticides. The stems on celery cup inward, making it hard to wash the entire surface.

2. Peaches- 67 pesticides. The exterior of peaches make them attractive to pests, which is why they are sprayed so frequently.

3. Strawberries – 53 pesticides which are easily absorbed by the soft skin of strawberries.

4. Apples – 47 pesticides. Washing apples helps, but isn’t 100% effective

5. Domestic Blueberries – 13 pesticides on a single sample.

6. Sweet Bell Pepper – 63 pesticides. While many can be washed away, chances are some will still remain.

7. Spinach, Kale, Collard Greens – 45 on spinach and 67 on kale.

8. Grapes (imported) – Thin skin which allows for easy absorption

9. Potatoes – Careful for the skin! Studies have found it is associated with 36 pesticides

10. Domestic Cherries – Found to have 3x the pesticides as imported cherries!

Cleanest

1. Onions – No samples were found to have more than 1 pesticide

2. Asparagus – 90% tested had no detectable pesticides.

3. Eggplant – The thick skin of eggplant protects it from pests, so a lot of spraying isn’t required.

4. Avocado – The thick skin acts as a barrier for chemicals.

5. Pineapple – Fewer than 10% of detectable pesticides.

I plan to keep this list handy next time I find myself in the produce department of my supermarket. Another way to reduce your exposure to pesticides: thoroughly wash your produce!!

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Yesterday I decided to switch things up a bit on the exercise front. Instead of my typical running and strength exercises, I arrived at the gym and hopped on the stationary bike for 20 minutes. I love how mileage racks up twice as quickly as with running, and was pleased when the bike told me I rode 4 miles. After warming my legs up, I attended the Bodyflow class, which is a “Yoga, Tai Chi, Pilates workout that builds flexibility and strength and leaves you feeling centered and calm” (from the Les Miles website). It was a great switch up from my normal routine, and helped me get in some serious stretching. I need to remember the importance of incorporating yoga and stretching into my fitness routine, as it seems really beneficial to not only my running, but my emotional health as well.

For dinner I prepared an easy and tasty (says Derek) chicken dish that was my take on a Chicken Milanese. This was my first time preparing a meal in the new kitchen, and boy oh boy did I enjoy myself. I promise to share the recipe with you later!

image-205

And finally, TGIF! Have a happy weekend, everyone!

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2 thoughts on “Dirty v. Clean Produce

  1. Pingback: A Weekend in Foodie Paradise + Chicken Milanese | eatsandfastfeets

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